Cristina Lanzas

Cristina Lanzas

Associate Professor

Cristina Lanzas is Associate Professor of Infectious Disease in North Carolina State University (NCSU). Dr. Lanzas joined the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology at NCSU in January 2015. Previously, she was Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at University of Tennessee and senior personnel at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, a National Science Foundation Synthesis Center. She received her degree in Veterinary Medicine from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain in 2000 and her M.Sc. (2003) and Ph.D. (2007) in Animal Sciences from Cornell University.

 

Samantha Erwin

Samantha Erwin

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

Sam completed her Ph.D. and M.S. in mathematics from Virginia Tech where she developed math models of immune responses to infections diseases. She completed a B.S. in Mathematics from Murray State University where she researched invasive plant species.

http://samanthaerwin.wordpress.com/ 

Daniel Dawson

Daniel Dawson

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

Dr. Dan Dawson received a BS and MS in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida in 2004 and 2006, respectively, and a PhD in Environmental Toxicology from Texas Tech University in 2016. Dan is broadly interested in understanding and modeling the patterns and underlying processes of natural and anthropogenic systems. As a post-doctoral researcher in the Lanzas lab, he is applying network and individual-based modeling approaches to cattle contact data to study the transmission dynamics of pathogenic E. coli in feed-lot cattle.

Kale Davies

Kale Davies

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

Kale is a postdoctoral research scholar working in the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology at North Carolina State University. He completed both his undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the University of Adelaide, receiving a Bachelor of Mathematical Sciences with Honours before completing his PhD in Applied Mathematics. Currently his research focuses on the development of general mathematical models for environmentally transmitted infections. Using these models, we will gain insight into the spread of Clostridium difficile in hospitals.
William Love

William Love

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

Annie Wang

Annie Wang

DVM-PhD student

I am a DVM-PhD student at NCSU where work with Dr. Lanzas and Dr. Sid Thakur to understand the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant enteric pathogens using both mathematical modeling and molecular techniques. I earned my BS in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and MPH in Epidemiology, both at the University of Michigan. My broader professional interests include infectious disease epidemiology, emerging zoonoses, and global health.

Trevor Farthing

Trevor Farthing

PhD student

In 2014, Trevor earned his B.A. in Environmental Studies & Asian Studies from Augustana College. Following that, he worked with the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) and helped develop predictive models capable of tracking global movements of known terrorist  groups, infectious diseases and other safety concerns. In 2016, he graduated from Tarleton State University with his M.S. in Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences. Through his masters research, he sought to improve Texas wildlife habitat value by suppressing invasive bermudgrass (Cynodon dactylon). Here, Trevor is working to develop models that predict environmental enteric-pathogen contamination and transmission across different spatial scales. 

Hillary Dimig

Hillary Dimig

Undergraduate Research Assistant

I am a senior in Chemical Engineering with minors in Biotechnology and Chinese Studies. I recently finished my final co-op rotation with DuPont in Richmond, VA. Last summer, I completed an REU at the University of Alabama where I worked on a project identifying substrate, pretreatment methods, and conditions for converting lignocellulosic corn agricultural residue to butanol for use as a biofuel with genetically modified C. cellulovorans.  On campus, I’m part of the Sustainability Stewards, Cellular Agriculture Society, and Food Recovery Network. I’m very interested in public health, and currently trying to figure out how I can combine it with chemical engineering after graduation.

 

Lydia Ashburn

Lydia Ashburn

Undergraduate Research Assistant

I am a junior studying biomedical engineering with minors in Spanish and international studies. On campus, I am involved in Engineering World Health, Girls Engineering Change, and Timmy Global Health. I recently completed a research project in the biomedical engineering department studying the human immune system response to tissue injury, specifically focusing on macrophage behavior and future applications to stem cell therapies. After graduation, I plan to approach public health issues such as antimicrobial resistance from a technical perspective, whether that be through researching disease spread or engineering better medicines.

 

Kyra Vancil

Kyra Vancil

Undergraduate Research Assistant

I am a senior studying animal science at NCSU. This summer I interned at the Duke Lemur Center where my work focused on how proper animal husbandry practices can reduce disease transmission between humans and non-companion animal species. On campus, I am involved with the Pre-Vet Club through which I have volunteered at local animal clinics and the SPCA of Wake County. I am interested in the effect that antimicrobial resistance has on the efficacy of infectious disease treatment, specifically in small animal hospitals. After graduation, I plan to work for a year at a small animal clinic before applying to veterinary school.

 

Past lab members at NCSU:

Shi Chen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Health Informatics, University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Brinkely Raynor, PhD-DVM student, University of Pennsylvania

Diya Sashidhar, PhD student in Mathematics, University of Washington